Slitta’s More Red

img_1136Slitta is not playing fair and the year just started. Yesterday, the D1CMG artist debuted his second album More Red.

Still riding a wave from his highly successful August debut, Pink & Red, Slitta is showing no signs of slowing down. More Red is already on target to surpass its predecessor, only serving as evidence that Slitta is only getting better and better.

More Red is an 11 track effort produced nearly in its entirety by 80Apes. Despite falling short of the 30 minute mark, More Red leaves nothing to be desired. Slitta reiterates that street life is multifaceted and gives fans a looks at some of those faces.

Slitta’s versatility, talent, and work ethic are on full display for More Red. Slitta is the only artist to appear on the album. Slitta produced nearly half of the track and mixed and mastered the album himself.

The lead single “Just Like That” is indicative of Slitta’s energy. The video for which debuted four days ago. The follow up single “Dirty Game” is a look at the less glamorized portions of street life. The Englewood Trap Angel appears almost vulnerable in the visual. Alone surrounded by papers strewn about an open bottle of cognac and a computer. The simple yet powerful image accentuates Slitta’s lyrics, allowing fans to focus on what matters most: the music.

More Red

Ty Money

It’s been a hell of a week for Harvey based rapper Ty Money. He started the week taking over the internet with images of himself with a goat and a Porché in front of the now defunct Arnies Idle Hour, a Harvey landmark. Thursday, Ty Money debut the visual for “Never Fair” with 147 Calboy. Yesterday, Ty Money brought it all together with release of Money, v. The State.

Anyone who knows anything about Harvey knows about Arnie’s Idle Hour. That fact made Arnie’s the logical choice for Ty Money’s first photo shoot of 2019. Ty Money has given several nods to the strip club, that now operates under the name Boogie Nights, over the years. As for the Porché and the goat, Ty Money is undoubtedly one the greatest artists to ever come from Harvey, so perhaps it all makes sense.

“Never Fair” is the perfect song to start the first quarter for Ty Money. The established rapper joined forces with up and comer 147 Calboy for and undeniable bop. Money stands firm on his rap style that fans have grown to know and love. His combination of storytelling and witty punchlines appears to be better than ever. 147 Calboy, though much less seasoned, appears to have no problem keeping up with his fellow 147 Street representative. Calboy delivers smart lyrics of his own, making “Never Fair” a must hear.

Ty Money kicked off the weekend with the release of Money, v. The State. A joint effort with DJ Victorious, Money, v. The State is five tracks of Ty Money at his best. The first body of work Ty Money has released since being released from jail fans can breathe easy knowing that the King of Sibley is back and better than ever.

Money, v. The State

Kush – Dolo

Kush is starting the year off right. This week, the Chicago based lyricist debuted the visual for his single “Dolo.”

“Dolo” is an ode to Kush’s loyalty and the visual could not be more befitting. Despite aerial shots of Chicago and pristine editing Brian Edwards kept the concept of the visual simple, focusing on Kush and his performance. In a refreshing change of pace, Kush appears in most of the scenes alone. In other scenes he accompanied by one other person, but unlike some his past visuals at no point does he appear with an entourage.

G. Mitch Knows Girls Need Love

Summer Walker made waves in 2018 with the smash “Girls Need Love.” G. Mitch is starting 2019 riding those very waves with his soulful remix to “Girls Need Love.”

“Girls Need Love” was undoubtedly one of the biggest songs of the summer and though summer days are long gone, G. Mitch’s “Girls Need Love” provides just as much heat. G. Mitch’s uniquely soulful sound puts a spin on the song anyone could appreciate.

A bit longer than the original G. Mitch’s “Girls Need Love” is even a bit different. While G. Mitch took the liberty of rewriting the lyrics he certainly didn’t lose any of the song’s integrity.